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A Quick Look Inside Artisan’s Asylum (Video)

Artisan’s Asylum is located near Boston and it’s probably one of the world’s biggest and most successful maker spaces. They started out in about 4,000 or 5,000 square feet and then expanded several times. They currently have 31,000 square feet and I’ve heard they’re considering expanding to 40,000 or more. I don’t think this video shows just how big they are because the bicycle rider goes pretty fast and doesn’t turn his or her head much.

In addition to providing access to well-equipped workshops (woodworking, welding, machining, bike repair, electronics) they also rent various size spaces for storage or private work areas. That’s what the cubicles are for.

We’re also planning on renting affordable private work space and I’m very curious about why they didn’t make their cubicle walls higher and enclose them a little more. Wall space is very valuable in a workshop because you can hang tools or shelves on them. Walls can also help contain noise and dust.

 

2 comments to A Quick Look Inside Artisan’s Asylum (Video)

  • Molly Rubenstein
    August 3, 2012 at 9:34 am | Reply

    To answer your question: we left the cubicle walls short on purpose. It means that you can look out across the space and see people working; the studio renters aren’t hidden from each other. For some people, that exposure can be a distracting work environment; those who choose to be here do so because it’s inspiring to them to come into contact so consistently with the other makers in the building. In standard artist studio complexes it can be hard to generate a sense of community; everyone’s in their own private little box.

    Many people do choose to build up some height and add shelving and wall storage – we don’t stop them from creating alternative solutions.

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